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US Senate passes bill approving Keystone XL pipeline project

January 30th, 2015

The US Senate has passed a bill approving construction of the proposed Keystone XL crude oil pipeline by a 62-36 vote after 3 weeks of debate. Nine Democrats joined 53 Republicans in the affirmative. Two Independents—Angus King (Me.) and Bernard Sanders (Vt.)—voted with 34 Democrats in opposition.

Oxy cuts capital budget by a third

January 30th, 2015

In the midst of falling oil prices, Occidental Petroleum Corp., Houston, expects to reduce its total capital spending for 2015 to $5.8 billion from $8.7 billion in 2014.

MARKET WATCH: NYMEX natural gas prices drop after storage report

January 30th, 2015

US natural gas closed at its lowest price in more than 2 years on the New York market Jan. 29 following the government’s weekly gas storage report, which showed storage levels fell less than some analysts had expected.

Understanding the reinforcing ability of carbon nanotubes

January 30th, 2015
A new article explores what is preventing the reinforcing ability of carbon nanotubes from being used in a ceramic matrix. Ever since their discovery, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been considered the ultimate additive to improve the mechanical properties of structural ceramics, such as aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and zirconium dioxide. Yet despite the remarkable strength and stiffness of CNTs, many studies have reported only marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties after these super-materials were added.

After Keystone nod, Congress should okay ANWR leasing

January 30th, 2015

Now that it has passed legislation supporting the Keystone XL pipeline, Congress should approve oil and gas leasing of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge coastal plain in Alaska.

Mercury in Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus) Maternity Colonies and Its Correlation with Freshwater Acidity in Nova Scotia, Canada

January 30th, 2015

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Environmental Science & Technology
DOI: 10.1021/es5050375

Disentangling Natural and Anthropogenic Sources of Atmospheric Sulfur in an Industrial Region Using Biomonitors

January 30th, 2015

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Environmental Science & Technology
DOI: 10.1021/es505292t

Spatial Confinement of a Co3O4 Catalyst in Hollow Metal–Organic Frameworks as a Nanoreactor for Improved Degradation of Organic Pollutants

January 30th, 2015

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Environmental Science & Technology
DOI: 10.1021/es505014z

Phosphorus in Manure and Sewage Sludge More Recyclable than in Soluble Inorganic Fertilizer

January 30th, 2015

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Environmental Science & Technology
DOI: 10.1021/es503387y

Updating satellite data on seas could dramatically reduce search and rescue times for lost planes, ships

January 30th, 2015
A new satellite imaging concept could significantly reduce search areas for missing boats and planes. Researchers have been trialling a concept for using satellite imagery to significantly improve the chances of locating ships and planes, such as the missing Malaysian flight MH370, lost at sea. A preliminary study identified 54 satellites with 85 sensors, currently only taking images of land, which could be used to take images of Earth's oceans and inland waters. The research team believe regularly updated images of the seas via these satellites could enable the reduction of search areas for missing ships to just a few hundred square miles. This offers the possibility of dramatically reducing search and rescue times and significantly improving chances of survival for missing ships.
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