Finding extraordinary engineers for exceptional clients

Efficient Aerospace Methods to keep Planes in the Air

October 8th, 2014

There aren’t many industries that value safety more than the world of aerospace. Aviation engineers spend rewarding careers formulating and developing new innovations improving aircraft efficiency and ultimately creating a more secure environment for both passengers and crew.

As the aviation industry continues to expand and carrying more travelers and cargo, improving safety in an environmentally sustainable fashion is a prime directive of many aerospace engineering programs. What follows is a look at one engineering program’s attempt to find non-destructive methods to improve aircraft maintenance and safety.

The A*STAR Aerospace Program offers Innovations in Aircraft Maintenance

Researchers and engineers at the Agency for Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR) are developing methods to detect aircraft components in need of repair earlier than previously possible. Their hope is to lessen the cost of aircraft maintenance while increasing passenger safety. Leveraging non-destructive methods to find defects also saves time and money.

One major problem with aircraft is when water seeps into the body. A*STAR Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology’s Dmitry Isakov is leading a project to detect water in aircraft components before it adversely impacts performance during flight.

“Water always finds the easiest way to get in, which is around discontinuities such as joints and bolts. Once inside, the water expands and contracts as it freezes and melts, damaging structures, causing corrosion and increasing the aircraft’s weight,” said Isakov.

Detecting Water with a Vacuum

The engineers leverage a vacuum to detect water in an aircraft’s body. The vacuum causes the water to boil at room temperature with a resultant fast cooling detectable using thermal imagery. “Water detection using my vacuum method requires just one technician, is fast and highly sensitive, and there is no ambiguity with the sealant,” added Isakov.

This improvement in fault detection makes maintenance both more accurate and more inexpensive — a perfect result for an engineer.

If these aviation engineering innovations inspire you to take your career even further, talk to the talented staff at The Talley Group. As one of the top engineering staffing agencies in the Northwest, they are a great source of Seattle engineering jobs and timely career advice. Schedule a meeting with them today!

Successful Use of an Autonomous Unmanned Aircraft

September 10th, 2014

Aeronautics and the world of aviation innovation remain one of the most intriguing engineering disciplines. Obviously, Seattle — home to Boeing and many other airplane manufacturers — is a great place to be for aviation engineers. The growth of autonomous unmanned aircraft is yet another example of innovative engineers raising the bar for the industry as a whole.

Let’s take a closer look at aviation engineering and its use for unmanned aircraft.

Integrating Drones into Today’s Civil Air Space

Introducing unmanned aircraft into the current modern civil air space is one of the biggest remaining challenges for aviation researchers. In fact, a new report from the National Research Council notes key barriers to drone integration while recommending a plan of action to solve any pressing issues.

John-Paul Clarke, associate professor of aerospace engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, co-chaired the NRC committee that wrote the report. “There is little doubt that over the long run the potential benefits of advanced unmanned aircraft and other increasingly autonomous systems to civil aviation will indeed be great, but there should be equally little doubt that getting there while maintaining the safety and efficiency of the nation’s civil aviation system will be no easy matter,” said Clarke.

Unmanned Aircraft Development on the Increase

The work of Clarke’s research team is becoming more important, as more and more drones enter the public airspace. Applications for these unmanned aircraft include crop dusting, traffic monitoring, and even fighting forest fires. One of the major technical barriers involved in air traffic control with drones is predicting their flight paths based on the drone’s autonomous reactions to current conditions.

Other potential issues involve regulatory and certification policies for unmanned aircraft, in addition to social considerations, like privacy and safety concerns. Still, the world of autonomous unmanned aircraft provides another growing arena for interested engineers to leverage their creativity and intellect.

If the exciting world of aviation engineering inspires you to take your career to a higher level, talk to the experts at The Talley Group. As one of the top engineering staffing agencies in the Northwest, they remain a great source of Seattle engineering jobs. Schedule some time with them today!

Washington State has the Highest Paid Aerospace Engineering Jobs

June 13th, 2014

With the Seattle metropolitan area being home to Boeing and a host of smaller manufacturers supporting that aeronautics industry giant, there is no surprise that Washington State boasts the highest average salaries for aerospace engineers. A recent report from the Department of Labor confirmed the Pacific Northwest’s dominant position in the world of aviation employment.

Other states on the list included Kansas, with a robust industry centered on Wichita, the rocket industry’s favorite state, Alabama, United Technologies Corporation’s home state of Connecticut, and the Sunshine State of Florida. Still, for aerospace engineers living in the Seattle area, the opportunities for lucrative employment remain abundant.

The Seattle Aerospace Industry continues to thrive

Boeing continues to be at the forefront of the aviation industry, with state of the art innovations in the areas of commercial flight, defense and security, as well as the new frontier of space travel. For aeronautics engineers currently living in Washington State, or those considering a move to the Northwest, the job opportunities are plentiful. This boom period is expected to continue, as the aerospace industry is generally able to withstand the economic downturns that hamper other business sectors.

As mentioned earlier, the power and size of Boeing means that many other aerospace companies supporting that giant are able to thrive in the Seattle metropolitan area. Seattle Aero is an example of this kind of business. They provide aerospace parts and service to Boeing and a host of other aircraft manufacturers all over the world.

There are dozens of aviation industry firms just like Seattle Aero located in Washington State. If you are just getting into aerospace engineering straight out of college or even if you boast a fully-developed career as an aviation engineer, Seattle and Washington are definitely the place to be. It might be time to consider relocating to the area for one of the many available lucrative opportunities.

When trying to find work in the Seattle aeronautics industry, a partnership with an experienced recruiter makes perfect sense. The Talley Company is one of the top engineering staffing agencies in Washington State and a great source of Seattle aerospace jobs, with the knowledgeable recruiters on hand able to help your career take off. Make it a point to chat with them today!

Cosmic Music from Dying Stars

September 10th, 2012

Many people think of outer space as a place that is silent, desolate. And all we really know of it is what we can see, through light. However, Janna Levin, a professor of physics and astronomy at Barnard College, refutes that idea. Levin explained in a TED Talk about the sounds the universe can make, particularly while going through dramatically changing events.

Levin researches the early universe, including chaos theory and black hole creation. She’s also the author of “How the Universe Got Its Spots” and “A Madman Dreams of Turing Machines.”

Most “normal” sounds cannot exist in the vacuum of space. However, there are tens of thousands of black holes in space, formed by dying stars. These black holes spin around each other, treating spacetime (any model that combines space and time into a continuum) like a drum. When these gravitational waves hit Earth, some detectors are able to measure the movements and amplify the sound.

In an interview with CNN, Levin explained the space-sound phenomenon. “It’s important to realize the universe isn’t a silent film, because space itself wobbles and rumbles like a drum in response to all of these things unfolding in the cosmos,” Levin said.

Levin also believes that with the right recording and adjustments, people could hear these changes in the universe. While there is no air in space to compress the ringing against your ear, creating sound, the space itself is “ringing and squeezing and stretching,” allowing your eardrums to respond. The dramatic events are what your ears would take the most notice of.

Scientists are now designing experiments that can pick up the sounds in space–sounds that could even be played on your stereo, for the human ear to hear.

However, Levin cautions that listening to these space symphonies could be dangerous to your hearing, and head, in general.

“Your head would be squeezed and stretched unhelpfully, so you might have trouble understanding what’s going on,” Levin said.

To listen to and see examples of Levin’s theories of the sounds of space and black hole collisions, check out her webpage: http://www.jannalevin.com/science.html.

Contact The Talley Group for the best candidates who may prove new scientific and engineering theories.

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