Finding extraordinary engineers for exceptional clients

Efficient Aerospace Methods to keep Planes in the Air

October 8th, 2014

There aren’t many industries that value safety more than the world of aerospace. Aviation engineers spend rewarding careers formulating and developing new innovations improving aircraft efficiency and ultimately creating a more secure environment for both passengers and crew.

As the aviation industry continues to expand and carrying more travelers and cargo, improving safety in an environmentally sustainable fashion is a prime directive of many aerospace engineering programs. What follows is a look at one engineering program’s attempt to find non-destructive methods to improve aircraft maintenance and safety.

The A*STAR Aerospace Program offers Innovations in Aircraft Maintenance

Researchers and engineers at the Agency for Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR) are developing methods to detect aircraft components in need of repair earlier than previously possible. Their hope is to lessen the cost of aircraft maintenance while increasing passenger safety. Leveraging non-destructive methods to find defects also saves time and money.

One major problem with aircraft is when water seeps into the body. A*STAR Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology’s Dmitry Isakov is leading a project to detect water in aircraft components before it adversely impacts performance during flight.

“Water always finds the easiest way to get in, which is around discontinuities such as joints and bolts. Once inside, the water expands and contracts as it freezes and melts, damaging structures, causing corrosion and increasing the aircraft’s weight,” said Isakov.

Detecting Water with a Vacuum

The engineers leverage a vacuum to detect water in an aircraft’s body. The vacuum causes the water to boil at room temperature with a resultant fast cooling detectable using thermal imagery. “Water detection using my vacuum method requires just one technician, is fast and highly sensitive, and there is no ambiguity with the sealant,” added Isakov.

This improvement in fault detection makes maintenance both more accurate and more inexpensive — a perfect result for an engineer.

If these aviation engineering innovations inspire you to take your career even further, talk to the talented staff at The Talley Group. As one of the top engineering staffing agencies in the Northwest, they are a great source of Seattle engineering jobs and timely career advice. Schedule a meeting with them today!

Supersonic: the Future of Aerospace Careers

August 13th, 2014

If you are lucky and talented enough to be an engineer in the aerospace industry, prepare for a supersonic explosion of career opportunities, as faster than sound flight looks to be making a comeback. The demise of the Concorde saw the end of supersonic passenger air travel, but some engineering innovations look to bring this state of the art aviation technology back into the mainstream.

Supersonic Speeds coming to Business Travel

One of the main reasons for the failure of the Concorde was its high maintenance costs, which, when combined with declining passenger numbers, caused the business model supporting the jet to falter. There isn’t as much investment risk with the smaller jets used in business travel, so this is the area earmarked for a supersonic travel renaissance.

The Boston-based aerospace engineering firm, Spike Aerospace, is developing a supersonic jet capable of making the trip from New York City to London in 3 to 4 hours — half of the 6 to 7 hour travel time when using a subsonic jet. Vik Kachoria, Spike Aerospace’s founder, noted the growing market demand for faster business travel.

“A supersonic jet will help businesses manage operations and make investments more dynamically. It will bring them closer to their customers, more often. The current fastest jet around for business use is Gulfstream G650, which can go at Mach .875. Our aircraft is designed to fly at 1.6 mach, which is twice the speed of any other aircraft out there, hence reducing the air travel time to about half,” said Kachoria.

An Option for Aircraft Rental Services?

The new business jet, known as the Spike S-512, is expected to retail from $60-80 million, and will carry anywhere from 12 to 18 passengers. With that price, it wouldn’t be a surprise if aircraft rental companies, like NetJets, purchase the model to enhance their service offerings to business travelers.

If these innovations in supersonic aerospace engineering inspire you to take your career to the next level, talk to the recruiting experts at The Talley Group. As one of the top engineering staffing agencies in Washington State, they are a great source for Seattle engineering jobs. Give them a call or send them an email today!

Aerospace Engineering Trends

March 7th, 2014

If you are looking for aerospace engineering jobs in Seattle stay up-to-date on industry trends:

The aerospace engineering industry is a lucrative one, especially in the Seattle metropolitan area. This is a discipline of engineering known for innovation, with new technologies moving quickly from the drawing board to testing and their subsequent commercial implementation.

Let’s take a look at a few key aerospace engineering trends, which are items anyone in the industry needs to keep on their radar screen. Some trends are relevant today, while others may come into to play in the future.

Craft-to-Craft Communication sees Wider Use

While collision avoidance systems remain a prime use-case for craft-to-craft communication systems, expect other applications for this growing technology trend. Boeing is developing a swarming system to be used by drones for primarily military reasons, but expect swarming to have applications for commercial air flight as well.

Airplanes also generate Big Data

Somewhat related to craft-to-craft communication is a DARPA project aimed to get handle of the massive amounts of data generated by aircrafts during flight. Some of this data could be use to communicate with other airplanes, while some can help pilots to make quick and accurate in-flight decisions. The U.S. Government earmarked $200 million to improve data handling and analysis in airplanes.

Is the Age of the Flying Commuter Close at Hand?

Workers commuting to and from their jobs in personal aircraft may no longer be the stuff of science fiction. Multiple designs for jet packs are in development and some firms are working on prototypes for flying cars. This new airborne morning commute looks to be a perfect application for Boeing’s swarming system.

A New-found Interest in Aerospace Engineering Education

These newfangled aerospace technologies need bright, young minds to help foster their successful implementation. There are now 25 stand alone aerospace engineering degree programs in the United States. Over 10 percent of the new aerospace engineering jobs that opened up in 2012 were taken by students.

Aerospace jobs in Seattle are generally plentiful. If you are interested in exploring a career in this rewarding industry, talk to the engineering staffing experts at The Talley Group. One of the leading engineering agencies in the Seattle area, they can help you find a new position in aerospace engineering. Schedule some time with them today!

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Aerospace Engineering Trends you Need to Know

September 26th, 2013

No matter what specific discipline of engineering your education, background, or work experience resides, it pays to keep abreast of current engineering trends. If you aren’t directly involved in the world of aerospace, it makes no difference — new innovations here have applications across engineering as a whole. Here are a few aerospace engineering trends you need to know.

More Elaborate System Software

The system software used by airplanes is becoming more complex and functional, leading to improved two-way communication between planes and ground control. The result of this better communication is smoother landings and takeoffs that use less fuel, saving money for the airlines.

Improved Craft-to-Craft Communication

Better communication is also behind another aerospace engineering trend — this time between the aircraft themselves. Currently being developed for drones and expected to be ported to passenger aircraft shortly, this technology hopes to lessen the risk of mid-air collisions.

Big Data for Airplanes Too

Aircrafts primarily used for surveillance purposes are seeing increased emphasis placed on the extraction and analysis of the data they acquire. These “Big Data for Spy Planes” innovations are primarily the domain of the Department of Defense and their DARPA wing.

The Age of Flying Commuters

Apparently, that craft-to-craft communication technology will be needed soon, as straight out of “The Jetsons,” flying commuter technology is currently in the pipeline at many aircraft manufacturers. This technology is essentially piggybacking on some of the drone engineering currently in practice.

Aerospace Engineering Programs Growing

Education remains a vital aspect of any engineering discipline, and supporting this relative explosion in aeronautic technology innovation is a similar growth in aerospace engineering programs at the University level. Aerospace now ranks as the third most popular engineering discipline for new students.

If these aerospace engineering innovations have inspired you to take a closer look at the field, or maybe you are interested in further your career in one of the other engineering disciplines, talk to the experts at The Talley Group. One of the top engineering staffing companies in the Seattle area, they can help ensure your new career takes flight or an existing career stays aloft.

If you are looking for aerospace engineering contract jobs, contact The Talley Group today.

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