Finding extraordinary engineers for exceptional clients

Sustainable Growth and the Role of Engineering

May 13th, 2015

A career in engineering offers you many benefits – most notably the potential for a lucrative salary and a sense of professional and personal accomplishment. That latter benefit really comes into play when working on an engineering project that helps the general public. The civil engineering discipline definitely provides many opportunities to use your skills for the common good.

Achieving a sustainable growth model is a worthy goal for many entities in the world – countries, municipalities, and more. With the specter of climate change, it becomes even more important when contrasting business development and growth against the environment’s ability to provide the necessary natural resources that support expansion. Let’s take a closer look at how civil engineering makes a difference in this area.

Sustainable Engineering in the 21st Century

The importance of technology’s influence on sustainability has led to a new term called sustainable engineering. While many areas of engineering can contribute to improved sustainability, civil engineering offers you the greatest chance to make a significant difference. Water supply systems, sustainable housing development, energy efficient transportation networks, and waste management are all areas of civil engineering that directly contribute to sustainability.

Applying green engineering techniques to these kinds of projects allows professionals to make a significant difference in the conservation of natural resources, while still providing the economic growth and development that benefit both the business world and the public. Discovering new techniques and processes to improve efficiency is one way engineers are able to make a positive impact using their skills and experience.

The Three Dimensional Model of Sustainable Development

A three-dimensional accounting framework known as the “triple bottom line” generally gets applied during the planning stages of projects leveraging sustainable engineering techniques. The three domains in this model describe a project’s impacts on the economy, the environment, and society as a whole. Some refer to these domains as the “3 Ps” which stand for people, profit, and the planet.

The ultimate goal for any project involves finding that sweet spot in the middle where all three areas are satisfied in a sustainable manner. In many cases, input from civil engineers helps a project hit that sweet spot by leveraging additional efficiencies derived from engineering innovations. This is especially notable in public transportation systems and improved water and waste utilities.

Ultimately, every civil engineer needs to pay close attention to the 3 Ps in the triple bottom line to ensure their work benefits the public both now and in the future.

If the promise of sustainable engineering inspires you to take your career to the next level, talk to the industry experts at The Talley Group. As one of the top engineering staffing agencies in Washington State, we are a great source of Seattle engineering jobs and business insight. Make it a point to meet with us at your earliest convenience.

Questions all Civil Engineer Candidates Should be Prepared to Answer During an Interview

March 10th, 2015

So, you’ve got an interview for a civil engineer position at one of the top companies in your area. Congratulations are in order. Before you can truly celebrate, however, you need to perform well when under the gun. You want to earn a second interview, or better yet, a job offer.

With that in mind, here are a few lines of questioning all civil engineer candidates need to feel comfortable with during their interview.

Expect to Detail the Tangible Engineering Achievements in your Career

Before the interview, spend some time reviewing previous projects from your work history while focusing on the innovative engineering solutions you either derived or helped to implement. If your resume is filled with these career examples – as it should be – the interview offers you the opportunity to go into more detail. You can illustrate how you’ll make a positive difference for their company when on the job.

Hiring Managers Want to Know How You’ll Work within a Team

Teamwork is very important in civil engineering, as is the ability to deal with clients or the public at large. Expect some questions aimed at finding out how well you work as part of a team, as well as your general communication skills as it applies to handling clients. Additionally, you can expect to be asked about the organizational structures you’ve been a part of throughout your career.

An Affinity for Technology Remains Important

Interviewers will want to understand your grasp of the state of the art when it comes to technology. This includes your comfort level with engineering software, as well as the mobile apps many engineers use while in the field. Civil engineering is a rapidly changing world, and companies want to ensure you will always strive to learn new things.

If you need any additional insight into interview preparation for a civil engineering position, talk to the experts at The Talley Group. As one of the top engineering staffing agencies in Washington, we are also a great source of Seattle engineering jobs. Schedule some time with us at your earliest convenience.

What Makes the Ideal Civil Engineering Manager?

January 7th, 2015

Project managers in any technical discipline bring a wide range of skills and abilities to the table. Those who work in civil engineering combine these capabilities with others unique to this niche within the engineering world. Needless to say, well-rounded individuals able to see a project from many different perspectives tend to thrive in this role.

So what makes an ideal civil engineering project manager? Let’s take a closer look.

Understanding the Triple Constraint is Vital for Any Project Manager

Most projects — civil engineering and otherwise — rely on something called the triple constraint, which describes the interrelationship between time, cost, and quality within said project. A common refrain regarding this constraint states “you can have any two of those three.” In short, if you want something done quickly and cheaply, the quality will suffer.

Civil engineering project managers must have the ability to successfully balance the three items on the proverbial triple constraint. This takes great technical and analytical skills combined with intuition as well as strong communication abilities, especially when a project is taking too long or goes over budget. Navigating the triple constraint is why project managers are well paid.

Financial Skills are a plus for the Civil Engineering Manager

Most civil engineering projects must be completed on time with superior quality. Thus, being able to understand the financial aspects of a project is vital, considering that a project completed quickly with no defects will usually stress that project’s budget. Understanding costs and finances is an important skill of the project manager.

Don’t Forget Leadership and People Skills

A civil engineering project manager is also a leader with exemplary people skills. The ability to inspire other engineers and team members plays an important role in the success of any project. Ultimately, the best engineering project managers are great leaders who inspire their team members to a high level of performance.

If you are a civil engineer looking to move into a management role, talk to the experts at The Talley Group. As one of the top staffing agencies in Washington State, and a great source of Seattle civil engineering jobs, we can help your career immensely. Make it a point to meet with us today!

What Subset of Civil Engineering is Right for You?

November 12th, 2014

The broad world of engineering contains many different disciplines, including civil engineering. Even within the practice of civil engineering, there are a host of specializations that might be worth focusing on in your career. They run the gamut from roadway design to water supply management to construction engineering.

The one thing that ties these subcategories together is “civil” — the products of this engineering work are usually for the common good of all. Having said that, which of these civil engineering subsets is right for your career? Let’s take a look at a few to see if any provide inspiration.

Highway Engineering puts you On the Road Again

If you love the open road, consider specializing in road and highway engineering. Performing site surveys gives you a chance to get out of the office and travel to different locations. You would be able to leverage your knowledge in mathematics and physics to ensure a superior road design especially in geographically challenging locales.

Overseeing road construction allows you to display management capabilities which remain relevant for any engineering discipline. There is also a lot of variety in road engineering, especially considering the bridges, road cuts, and other infrastructure improvements that are part of highway construction.

Supplying Water an Important Aspect of Civil Engineering

Getting water from its sources to where it is needed is another important subset of civil engineering. The design and building of dams, reservoirs, aqueducts, and more are the typical deliverables from these kinds of civil engineers.

Construction Engineering involves more than just Buildings

Considering the infrastructure crisis in this country, the need for construction engineers continues to grow. Everything from buildings to the bridges needed by highway engineers is on their docket. The maintenance of current structures is also a vital part of this engineering discipline.

Civil engineers are an important part of society with a wide range of disciplines under its banner. If you are interested in entering this needed profession, talk to The Talley Group. As one of the top engineering staffing companies in Washington State, they are also a great source of Seattle civil engineering jobs. Make it a point to talk with them today!

Ethical Concerns for Civil Engineers

October 15th, 2014

The civil engineering field, like other engineering disciplines, relies on ethics to provide a moral center. Integrity, dignity, and honor remain the core traits for which all civil engineers strive. This happens through dedication to the hard work and problem solving that benefits both their clients and the public as a whole.

A Closer Look at the Core Principles of Engineering Ethics

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) maintains a Code of Ethics that gives guidance for how engineers can achieve the desired ethical impact on their profession. Four fundamental principles help execute this overall process.

  • Using their knowledge and skill for the enhancement of human welfare and the environment.
  • Being honest and impartial and serving with fidelity the public, their employers and clients.
  • Striving to increase the competence and prestige of the engineering profession.
  • Supporting the professional and technical societies of their disciplines.

These same principles also apply for engineers of all disciplines. Leveraging skill and knowledge in an honest fashion to serve, while helping to raise the bar for the engineering profession as a whole is an inspirational charge that both motivates existing engineers while attracting new blood to the profession.

ASCE Code of Ethics offers a Roadmap for Engineers to Thrive

Beyond its core principles, the ASCE Code of Ethics offers additional detail on how civil engineers can energize their career by following their guidelines and fundamental canons. Whenever an engineer is faced with a difficult decision regarding project work or even a change in employer, the Code of Ethics serves professionals well as both a guidebook and a source of inspiration.

All civil engineers, and all engineers for that matter, would benefit greatly by studying the ASCE Code of Ethics, and use the content within to drive how they face each working day.

If you are looking to take your civil engineering career to the next level, talk to the staffing experts at The Talley Group. As one of the top engineering staffing agencies in the area, they provide a good source of Seattle engineering jobs and more. Make it a point to schedule a meeting with The Talley Group today!

Civil Engineer Job Salary Review in Seattle WA

March 14th, 2014

Civil Engineer Jobs in Seattle: Salary Breakdown

Like most other engineering disciplines, civil engineers enjoy robust career benefits, including the rewards that come from performing a job needed by the public as a whole. Of course, civil engineering is also a well-paying profession with many opportunities for career development. The Seattle, Washington area is a solid place for the engineering profession in general, and civil engineering is no exception.

Average Civil Engineer Salary in Seattle

Civil engineers in the Seattle metropolitan area can expect to earn an average salary of $81,000 per year according to data from March of this year. This salary is about four percent higher than the average civil engineering salary for the entire United States. Once again, the Seattle region of the Northwest U.S. is a great place to be for engineers!

The national salary trend for civil engineers has held steady over the past two years. There have been some hills and valleys, but the salary index has remained close to 1.0, according to Indeed.com. As the economy continues to recover from the Great Recession, expect civil engineering salaries to trend upwards.

It pays to be an Experienced Civil Engineer

Becoming a “lifer” as a civil engineer can pay off in the long run, like most technical professions. Seattle’s average salary for a senior-level civil engineer comes in close to six figures at $98,000, but you can expect to find many senior positions in Seattle above the $100,000 level. Senior civil engineers specializing in highways average a little less salary at $81,000.

Structural engineering is another offshoot of civil engineering that can be lucrative with an average salary of $93,000. Engineers that want to move into project management will find a slightly higher pay rate. The average salary for civil engineer project managers in Seattle is $83,000.

If you are interested in many of the lucrative civil engineering jobs in Seattle, talk to engineering staffing experts at The Talley Group. As one of the leading engineering recruiters in the Seattle area, they are poised to help you and your career. Be sure to schedule some time with them today with a quick phone call or email.

 

JobBoard_CTA[2]

Civil Engineers giving U.S. Low Grade in Infrastructure

February 14th, 2014

The United States needs to upgrade its infrastructure and fast. That’s the opinion of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). The ASCE feels this country’s infrastructure is actually close to an overall failure.

This infrastructure, according to ASCE, includes roads, bridges, rail, drinking water, waste water, solid waste, and other facilities. Its importance to the quality of life in the United States cannot be overstated.

ASCE Provides an Infrastructure Grade every Four Years

ASCE releases its grades of U.S. infrastructure once every four years. While the 2013 grade of D+ is a slight improvement over the D received in 2009, this isn’t really a reason to celebrate or take an early summer vacation. The country’s infrastructure has averaged around a D grade since the mid 90s, primarily due to a lack of investment and delayed maintenance work.

Eight categories make up the ASCE infrastructure grade. These include capacity, condition, funding, future need, operation, maintenance, public safety, resilience and innovation. Solid waste earned the best grade in the current report card: a B-, while inland waterways and levees brought up the rear with a D-.

A Backlog of Maintenance Needs Funding

The ASCE study noted that new recurring methods of funding the nation’s infrastructure needs are vital for improving the grade. With proper funding, the pressing maintenance backlog can be lessened while also implementing long overdue modernization projects.

City and State level funding helped to improve the nation’s bridges grade, and private investment, enhancing overall efficiency and connectivity, improved the railway infrastructure across the nation.

The ASCE report concluded: “Infrastructure is also critical for long-term economic growth, increasing GDP, employment, household income, and exports. The reverse is also true – without prioritizing our nation’s infrastructure needs, deteriorating conditions can become a drag on the economy.

“For the U.S. economy to be the most competitive in the world, we need a first class infrastructure system.”

If working on the nation’s infrastructure needs inspired you to become a civil engineer, talk to engineering staffing experts at The Talley Group. As one of the leading leading recruiters for civil engineering jobs in Seattle, they can help you, your career, and possibly the country’s roads and bridges. Schedule some time with them today.

ContactUs_CTA[1]

Follow us: